Namur jousting stilts

MANY STILTWALKERS TRADITIONS BUT TWO MAIN FAMILIES OF STILTS IN THE WORLD

There are many differents stiltwalkers traditions and stilts practices in the world.  Each has developed its own stilt model linked to its needs and its environment.

But the different stilts model  can be resolved to two main types.

The first family of  stilts are fixed to the legs and leave the hands free for the user. This type of stilt is ideal for sprints and long distance, dances or acrobatics.

The second family includes stilts gripped by the arms and where the feet rest on a skate without being fixed to it.

©Pol Englebert

Some examples of stilts used around the world:

NAMUR JOUSTING STILTS

©Skuds – Simon Fusillier

You won’t be surprised to know that the Namur stilt belongs to this second family, which is best adapted for the battle, allowing one to slip off the stirrup when falling during the joust.

The actual joust stilts are an evolution of the oldest preserved Namur stilts, dating back to the 18th century (these ancient stilts can be seen in the Namur Decorative Arts Museum).

The jousting stilts are made from beech by a local carpenter.

Further Information on the Namur Joust Stilts :

  • The stilts now measure 202 cm.
  • The typical element of the combat stilt is a metal stirrup fixing the body of the stilt to its base. This system holds the foot in place without affixing it to the stilt situated at 84 cm.
  • The wicker handles which once orned the stilts have been removed due to their fragility
  • At ground level at their inferior extremity, the stilts are ringed in vue of limiting abrasion and insuring adherence on certain surfaces.